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Intel Supplies Tech to Waymo for Self-Driving Chrysler Pacifica Minivans

Intel through a news release with comments by Brian  Krzanich, chief executive officer, announced that the company is working with Google’s self-driving company Waymo.

Waymo’s newest vehicles, the self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans, feature Intel-based technologies for sensor processing, general compute and connectivity, enabling real-time decisions for full autonomy in city conditions.

As Waymo’s self-driving technology becomes smarter and more capable, its high-performance hardware and software will require even more powerful and efficient compute. By working closely with Waymo, Intel can offer Waymo’s fleet of vehicles the advanced processing power required for level 4 and 5 autonomy.

With 3 million miles of real-world driving, Waymo cars with Intel technology inside have already processed more self-driving car miles than any other autonomous fleet on U.S. roads. Intel’s collaboration with Waymo ensures Intel will continue its leading role in helping realize the promise of autonomous driving and a safer, collision-free future.

Intel processing power will be part of autonomous driving systems on the 2018 Audi A8.

To drive AI innovation, Intel is making strategic investments spanning technology, R&D and partnerships with business, government, academia and community groups.

BMW Group, Intel and Mobileye recently announced that they have signed a memorandum of understanding with the intention for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) to be the first automaker to join them in developing a world-leading, state-of-the-art autonomous driving platform for global deployment.

Intel and Mobileye announced on August 8, the completion of Intel’s tender offer for outstanding ordinary shares of Mobileye,

Aftger the completion of the tender offer of Mobileye. They announced that Mobileye started building a fleet of fully autonomous (level 4 SAE) vehicles for testing in the United States, Israel and Europe. The first vehicles will be deployed later this year, and the fleet will eventually scale to more than 100 automobiles.

In July 2016, BMW Group, Intel and Mobileye announced that they were joining forces to make self-driving vehicles a reality by collaborating to bring solutions for highly automated driving (Level 3) and fully automated driving (Level 4/5) into production by 2021. Since then, they have been designing and developing a scalable architecture that can be used by multiple automakers around the world, while at the same time maintaining each automaker’s unique brand identities.

Intel research shows that autonomously operated vehicle commercialization will gain steam by 2040 – generating an increasingly large share of the projected value and heralding the emergence of instantaneously personalized services.

Meanwhile Waymo is battling a lawsuit against Uber over the alleged theft of self-driving car trade secrets by one of its former employees. The company is seeking more time to examine Uber documents.